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CV101 Homework session 2
Read « Independence could revitalise Scotland – and England too” and “The Welcome Return of the Union Jack” (you will find the them in the Identity issues section). After reading the texts, answer the following questions in your own words. You should answer the questions on a separate sheet of paper.
A. « Independence could revitalise Scotland – and England too”
1. Give the date and source of the document
2. Summarise the journalist’s main idea
3. Make a list of the main arguments in favour of the Scottish independence
4. What according to the journalist is the main obstacle to it?

To prepare session 3
Read the Leading article : “The Welcome Return of the Union Jack”
1. Date/source of the document?
2. Look up for Gordon Brown and for Alex Salmond on the Internet. Who are they?
3. What has been the impact of the Olympic Games on the flag as a symbol?

CV101 To prepare session 4
A. Read about nationalism and minorities in the UK in J. Oakland, An Introduction to British Civilization.
B. Find some recent demographic data by religious and ethnic minority in the 2011 census (recensement).
C. Read the article "The World Comes to London", p. 22 in your textbook and answer the following questions on a separate sheet of paper :
1. How has net immigration evolved over the past decades?
2. How can you account for the massive immigration in the last 20 years?
3. What have been the main effects of immigration on Britain?
4. How does The Economist view immigration overall?

CV101 To prepare session 5
A. Look up for Brixton, Toxteth, Tottenham, Hackney on http://fr.mapsofworld.com/united-kingdom/london-city-map.html
B. Read the article “France’s style of rioting is a very suburban affair” (p. 24, 1st text). Answer the following questions:
1. Find about the Brixton riots (1981)
2. Compare the Brixton riots and the 2005 Paris riots. Find information in the text.
3. What do you learn about town planning (urbanism) in the UK and town planning in France (Paris mainly)?
C. After reading the text "Urban Riots : Thirthy Years after Brixton" (p. 24 bis), answer the following questions:
1. What are the common points between the 1981 riots and the 2011 riots?
2. What has changed since 1981?
3. Synthesis : what is the journalist's point ?

CV101 To prepare session 7 (December 1)
Read "A Revolution Postponed", p.52 on the Monarchy. Answer the following questions:
1. When was the article published? Find the date thanks to indications in the text .
2. What other institution does the journalist compare the monarchy with? (§2)
3. How does the journalist account for the British monarchy's continued existence in the 21st century (three main reasons given)?
4. What is the main question raised by the journalist? What is the journalist's main idea (30 words approx.)?


CV501 Religion and Politics in England (1534-1689)
Course outline and reading assignments

The textbook is available from the English Department Website. You will be given a paper version in class.

Session 1 – Introduction to the course : England in 1534. The political and religious background
 Read Smith “Prologue”; read textbook pp. 6-11
 List lay criticisms of the Church

Session 2 – Introduction II : Reformation in England
Method
 Read Smith (ch.1 & 2); pp. 12-24
 Study The First Act of Supremacy (1534) focusing on the notion of supremacy : How is it defined?
What kind of legitimation is sought in this act? What role is given to Parliament?

Session 3 – Henry VIII (1509-1547) & the Breach with Rome
 Read Smith ch. 8 & 10; textbook pp. 25-34
 Study Mary’s Act of Repeal (1554) focusing on : Mary’s aim and posture; the tone of the document

Session 4 - Edward VI (1547-1553) and Mary Tudor (1553-1558) : the uncertainties of Reformation in Tudor EnglandSynthesis :
Synthesis : To what extent can we say the Church was reformed in 1547?
 Read Foster “An Elizabethan Church Legacy?”; textbook pp. 35-38
 Study The Act of Uniformity (1559) focusing on: the aim of the act; the notions of unity, of uniformity. How is the act supposed to be enforced?

Session 5 - Elizabeth I (1558- 1603) (I) : the ‘Elizabethan Settlement’
 Read textbook pp. 39-49
 Synthesis on Elizabeth and the Tudors : Religious concord in Elizabethan England

Session 6 - Elizabeth I (II) : Unity and dissent in Elizabethan England
 Revise the Tudors

Session 7 - Mid-term exam : textual analysis on the Tudors
 Read textbook pp. 50-57
 Study James I on monarchy : What images does James I use to evoke the function of “king”? What impact do they have? What fundamental distinction does he make in defining the role of kings? What is his definition of a tyrant?

Session 8 – The reign of James I of England/ James VI of Scotland (1603- 1625) and the divine right of kings
+ Correction of the mid-term exam
 Read textbook pp. 58-66
 Study The Petition of Right (1628) p. 58 : Who are the petitioners? What is the king accused of? List the historical references you have in the text. What purpose do they serve?

Session 9 – Charles I (1625-1649) and laudism
 Read Textbook pp. 67-82
 Study The Root and Branch Petition (1640) p. 67 : What is referred to as “roots and branches”? What are the petitioners’ claims?

Session 10 – The Civil Wars
 Read textbook pp. 83-94

Session 11 – The regicide and the Interregnum (1649-1660)
 Revise the Tudors and the Stuarts up to 1649

Session 12 – Final exam : textual analysis or reflective paper on the Tudors and the first Stuarts (1534-1649)

Session 13 – The Restoration and the Glorious Revolution
+ Correction final paper



To prepare next session (October 27th ) VLA CV 101 – M.I. DUCROCQ

A. Read about multiculturalism in the UK in Oakland
B. Read the article “France’s style of rioting is a very suburban affair” (p. 24, 1st text). Answer the following questions on a separate sheet of paper:
1. Find about the Brixton riots.
2. Compare the Brixton riots and the 2005 Paris riots. Find information in the text.
3. What do you learn about town planning (urbanism) in the UK and town planning in France (Paris mainly)?
C. Read the article “Urban Riots” (p. 24 bis). Answer the following questions.
1. What are the common points between the 1981 riots and the 2011 riots?
2. What has changed since 1981?

MyDucrocq VLA CV101 Civilisation britannique

To prepare session 3 VLA CV 101 – M.I. DUCROCQ


1. To complete the course, read about nationalism and minorities in the UK in J. Oakland, British Civilization.

2. Read the article "The World Comes to London", p. 22 in your textbook and answer the following questions on a separate sheet of paper :
- How has net immigration evolved over the past decades?
- How can you account for the massive immigration in the last 20 years?
- What have been the main effects of immigration on Britain?
- How does The Economist view immigration overall?





MyDucrocq VLA CV 301 Course outline
LES ILES BRITANNIQUES DANS LA TRANSITION REVOLUTIONNAIRE
1745-1851

PART I POLITICAL REVOLUTIONS IN BRITAIN AND IN EUROPE – chronological framework / key changes in politics

Séance 1- 1753-1775
 A reminder of the Glorious revolution & the rise of parliamentary monarchy
- The rise of the party system/ Walpole & robinocracy; the rotten boroughs
- The call for radical reform of the system : John Wilkes
- George III
- Method
o Read W. Bagehot; study Romilly on the Sale of Seats (rotten boroughs) : Find about the author. What is the nature of the document? What kind of tone is used in the text? What kind of system is Romilly describing? What is his aim in describing it? Make an organised commentary out of these remarks.

Séance 2 – 1775-1815 (1)
- The American War of Independence
- TD Romilly
o E. Burke Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790 : find about Edmund Burke. In what circumstances did he write this text? Who is he referring to when using the pronoun “we” (and adjective “our”) and when using the possessive “your” (l. 75)? what effect does it have? Comment on line 41-43. What difference does he make between the notions of “improvement” (l.14, 26) and “innovation” (l.10)? What key values does he ascribe to the British Constitution?

Séance 3 – 1775-1815 (2)
- The French Revolution and its impact in Britain
- The Napoleonic or French Wars
- TD Burke
o T.B. Macaulay – Reform Debate Speech, 1831

Séance 4 – 1815-1851
- The Radical movement : Chartism
- The 1832 electoral reform
- TD Macaulay
o The Chartist Riots – The Times

PART II ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL REVOLUTIONS

Séance 5- The Industrial revolutionS
- TD The Chartist Riots
- Chronology
- Sectors of expansion

Séance 6 – Cause or consequence? The rise of the British Empire
- The conquest of India and the African colonies
- Political organisation
- The age of Free Trade

Séance 7 – Mid-term exam (19-20/11)

Séance 8 -- The impact of industrialisation (1)
- The urban development & the transformation of landscape: London & other cities
o Study F. Engels on Manchester

Séance 9 – The impact of industrialisation (2) : the discourse on poverty
- Philantropy
- Self Help
- The emergence of class consciousness; Marx and Engels
- The political organisation of the working class/ trade unionism
- Women and child labour

Correction of the exam
o Read Samuel Smiles – Self-Help ; Marx - Capital
o Study Women in the Pits

Séance 10 – The impact of industrialisation (3) : Art in the industrial age

PART III CULTURAL AND AESTHETIC REVOLUTIONS

Séance 11 - The religious landscape of Britain
- The End of Nonconformist and Catholic discrimination

Séance 12 – Final exam

Séance 13 – Scientific and artistic life
- Darwinism
- Palladianism
- Romanticism & the gothic – Burke’s Essay on the Origin of the Idea of the Sublime
- The Preraphaelite Brotherhood

Correction of the final exam


Edmund BURKE, Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790. > for questions see outline (session 2)

"You will observe that from Magna Charta to the Declaration of Right it has been the uniform policy of our constitution to claim and assert our liberties as an entailed inheritance derived to us from our forefathers, and to be transmitted to our posterity — as an estate specially belonging to the people of this kingdom, without any reference whatever to any other more general or prior right. By this means our constitution preserves a unity in so great a diversity of its parts. We have an inheritable crown, an inheritable peerage, and a House of Commons and a people inheriting privileges, franchises, and liberties from a long line of ancestors.
This policy appears to me to be the result of profound reflection, or rather the happy effect of following nature, which is wisdom without reflection, and above it. A spirit of innovation is generally the result of a selfish temper and confined views. People will not look forward to posterity, who never look backward to their ancestors. Besides, the people of England well know that the idea of inheritance furnishes a sure principle of conservation and a sure principle of transmission, without at all excluding a principle of improvement. It leaves acquisition free, but it secures what it acquires. Whatever advantages are obtained by a state proceeding on these maxims are locked fast as in a sort of family settlement, grasped as in a kind of mortmain forever. By a constitutional policy, working after the pattern of nature, we receive, we hold, we transmit our government and our privileges in the same manner in which we enjoy and transmit our property and our lives. The institutions of policy, the goods of fortune, the gifts of providence are handed down to us, and from us, in the same course and order. Our political system is placed in a just correspondence and symmetry with the order of the world and with the mode of existence decreed to a permanent body composed of transitory parts, wherein, by the disposition of a stupendous wisdom, molding together the great mysterious incorporation of the human race, the whole, at one time, is never old or middle-aged or young, but, in a condition of unchangeable constancy, moves on through the varied tenor of perpetual decay, fall, renovation, and progression. Thus, by preserving the method of nature in the conduct of the state, in what we improve we are never wholly new; in what we retain we are never wholly obsolete. By adhering in this manner and on those principles to our forefathers, we are guided not by the superstition of antiquarians, but by the spirit of philosophic analogy. In this choice of inheritance we have given to our frame of polity the image of a relation in blood, binding up the constitution of our country with our dearest domestic ties, adopting our fundamental laws into the bosom of our family affections, keeping inseparable and cherishing with the warmth of all their combined and mutually reflected charities our state, our hearths, our sepulchres, and our altars.
Through the same plan of a conformity to nature in our artificial institutions, and by calling in the aid of her unerring and powerful instincts to fortify the fallible and feeble contrivances of our reason, we have derived several other, and those no small, benefits from considering our liberties in the light of an inheritance. Always acting as if in the presence of canonized forefathers, the spirit of freedom, leading in itself to misrule and excess, is tempered with an awful gravity. This idea of a liberal descent inspires us with a sense of habitual native dignity which prevents that upstart insolence almost inevitably adhering to and disgracing those who are the first acquirers of any distinction. By this means our liberty becomes a noble freedom.
It carries an imposing and majestic aspect. It has a pedigree and illustrating ancestors. It has its bearings and its ensigns armorial. It has its gallery of portraits, its monumental inscriptions, its records, evidences, and titles. We procure reverence to our civil institutions on the principle upon which nature teaches us to revere individual men: on account of their age and on account of those from whom they are descended. All your sophisters cannot produce anything better adapted to preserve a rational and manly freedom than the course that we have pursued, who have chosen our nature rather than our speculations, our breasts rather than our inventions, for the great conservatories and magazines of our rights and privileges."
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